Dyes and Inks

Art materials are inherently hazardous. Even the least harmful products may have some amount of hazardous ingredients. Try reducing your exposure by using personal protective equipment, ventilating your space and only buying what you need.

The following product reviews have been requested by program partners. To know which of your existing products are safer to use, please review their Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) to see if they have the same ingredients as the products listed here.

Dyes and Inks

When to Use

When using dyes, please look for the following Color Index Names and Numbers:


C.I. Acid Brown 216
C.I. Direct Brown 112

C.I. Acid Orange 61
C.I. Direct Orange 39

C.I. Acid Violet 58
C.I. Basic Violet 1, Molybdatephosphate
C.I. Basic Violet 1, Molybdatesilicate
C.I. Reactive Violet 5

C.I. Acid Yellow 73
C.I. Direct Yellow 11, Lithium Salt
C.I. Direct Yellow 12
C.I. Direct Yellow 44
C.I. Vat Yellow 4
C.I. Natural Yellow 11

C.I. 35440
C.I. Acid Black 48
C.I. Leuco Sulphur Black 1 (9Ci)
C.I. Solvent Black 7

C.I. Solvent Red 35
C.I. Vat Red 14
C.I. Acid Red 343
C.I. Direct Red 111
C.I. Food Red 17:1

C.I. Vat Blue 18
C.I. Vat Blue 42
C.I. Vat Blue 43
C.I. Solvent Blue 38
C.I. Sulphur Blue 7
C.I. Leuco Sulphur Blue 13
C.I. Solubilised Sulphur Blue 10
C.I. Disperse Blue 3

C.I. Natural Green 3
C.I. Vat Green 9
C.I. Leuco Sulphur Green 2

Type

Consumer

Info on this product category: Paint (Artist)

Why Go Green

Many art products contain hazardous ingredients that are harmful to your health and the health of the environment. There are safer alternatives available for most categories of art materials. In case, safer alternatives cannot be used, use the recommended personal protective equipment and ventilation.

Criteria for Paint (Artist)

These products have been evaluated and shown to not contain carcinogens, asthmagens, mutagens, endocrine disruptors, neurotoxins and reproductive toxicants. They have been evaluated using the Pharos Project and the ChemHAT database.

Many heavy metals have been removed from art materials. Before you choose a hue over a heavy metal containing paint, look at the name and number of the pigment. Compare this with the list of approved pigments.

Last updated

Last updated: 
November 6, 2014

Reports

The Safer Art Products & Practices factsheet helps artists make safer decisions when it comes to purchasing, using and disposing art materials.

Guide for City Staff

Citywide Contract

Guide for Small Businesses & Homes

Many art products contain hazardous material that should not end up in the trash, recycling or composting bins or be poured down the drain.
Professionals: Call Recology SF's Very Small Quantity Generator Program at (415) 330-1425 to dispose of all art waste.
Hobby Artists: Call (415) 330-1405

Empty clean containers can be recycled in the Recycling bin.

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